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Home safe and tired

Sara Lingafelter
Sara Lingafelter
1 min read

I don’t have time or technology for the full trip report today — my laptop (with half my pictures), my camera cable, and my guidebooks are in Climbing Partner’s trunk. So, this is the teaser. I’ll try to get a full post up by Wednesday. Don and I had a fantastic trip… our original plan was a week of climbing in Red Rock Canyon, NV, but weather gave us an opportunity to go with the flow — we wound up climbing a few days in Red Rock, then heading to Joshua Tree for a stellar day of traditional climbing in one of my favorite places. We wrapped up the trip with a night in civilization in San Francisco, then did the long trip home last night. I’m working on a couple of posts stemming from the trip — the full report will be here in a few days at rockclimbergirl.com. Also, the Honda CR-V to Honda Extrememobile C-RV conversion (subtitled “how two people can live comfortably in a C-RV for a week without killing each other”) will get an entire long-awaited post all to itself. You are seriously not going to believe how everything fits together, and how (kind of by happy accident) there’s a place for everything, and everything in its place.

I’m also making my debut as the newest Climbing Reader Blogger shortly (stay tuned, I’ll be up there soon) and I’m contemplating a post for them on the topic of revisiting routes and places with “history.” As in — somewhere you’ve been, with a story, that you then go back to. There were a number of those on this trip, and it got me to thinking about how far we (as climbers, and people) come, and how much we (as climbers, and people) change over time.

For now, though, I have to stay focused on work. With little breaks to ponder how enormous my teeny tiny apartment feels after living in a Honda CR-V with a six-foot-tall dude and all our gear for a week, and marvel over the modern conveniences of a gas range (four whole burners? Ridiculous!) and my refrigerator.

Trip Reports

Sara Lingafelter

Sara (Grace) Lingafelter takes steps forward and backward toward a right-sized life on a daily basis.